Sedation Options

Sedation

 

Several medications are available to help create more relaxed, comfortable dental visits. Some drugs control pain, some help you relax, and others put you into a deep sleep during dental treatment. You and your dentist can discuss a number of factors when deciding which drugs to use for your treatment: the type of procedure, your overall health, history of allergies and your anxiety level are considered when determining which approach is best for your particular case. Working together you and your dentist can choose the most appropriate steps to make your dental visit as comfortable as possible.

 

What should every patient know about dental anesthesia?

 

Providing you with high-quality, appropriate care and making your dental visit as comfortable as possible are top priorities for the more than 155,000 dentist members of the American Dental Association (ADA). Advances in dental techniques and medications can greatly reduce—even eliminate—discomfort during dental treatment, and your dentist and the ADA want you to know about them. The following explains options available to help alleviate anxiety or pain that may be associated with dental care.

 

What are analgesics?

 

Non-narcotic analgesics are the most commonly used drugs for relief of toothache or pain following dental treatment. This category includes aspirin, acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as Ibuprofen.

Narcotic analgesics, such as those containing codeine, act on the central nervous system to relieve pain. They are used for more severe pain.

 

What is local anesthesia?

 

Topical anesthetics are applied to mouth tissues with a swab to prevent pain on the surface level. Your dentist may use a topical anesthetic to numb an area in preparation for administering an injectable local anesthetic. Topical anesthetics also may be used to soothe painful mouth sores. Injectable local anesthetics prevent pain in a specific area of your mouth during treatment by blocking the nerves that sense or transmit pain and numbing mouth tissues. They cause the temporary numbness often referred to as a “fat lip” feeling. Injectable anesthetics may be used in such procedures as filling cavities, preparing teeth for crowns or treating periodontal (gum) disease.

 

What is sedation and general anesthesia?

 

Anti-anxiety agents, such as nitrous oxide, or sedatives may help you relax during dental visits and often may be used along with local anesthetics. Dentists also can use these agents to induce “minimal or moderate sedation,” in which the patient achieves a relaxed state during treatment but can respond to speech or touch. Sedatives can be administered before, during or after dental procedures by mouth, inhalation or injection.

 

More complex treatments may require drugs that can induce “deep sedation,” causing a loss of feeling and reducing consciousness in order to relieve both pain and anxiety. On occasion, patients undergo “general anesthesia,” in which drugs cause a temporary loss of consciousness. Deep sedation and general anesthesia may be recommended in certain procedures for children or others who have severe anxiety or who have difficulty controlling their movements. The ADA provides guidelines to help dentists administer pain controllers in the safest manner possible. Dentists use the pain and anxiety control techniques mentioned above to treat tens of millions of patients safely every year. Even so, taking any medication involves a certain amount of risk. That’s why the ADA urges you to take an active role in your oral health care. This includes knowing your health status and telling your dentist about any illnesses or health conditions, whether you are taking any medications (prescription or non-prescription), and whether you’ve ever had any problems such as allergic reactions to any medications. It also includes understanding the risks and benefits involved in dental treatment, so that you and your dentist can make the best decisions about the treatment that is right for you. Understanding the range of choices that are available to relieve anxiety and discomfort makes you a well-informed dental consumer. If you have questions or concerns about your oral health care, don’t hesitate to talk to your dentist. If you still have concerns, consider getting a second opinion. Working together, you and your dentist can choose the appropriate steps to make your dental visit as safe and comfortable as possible, and to help you keep a healthy smile.

 

Sedation FAQ’s

 

Q: What is sedation?

 

Sedation is a technique to guide a child’s behavior during dental treatment. Medications are used to help increase cooperation and to reduce anxiety or discomfort associated with dental procedures. Sedative medications cause most children to become relaxed and drowsy. Unlike general anesthesia, sedation is not intended to make a patient unconscious or unresponsive.

 

Q: Who should be sedated for dental treatment?

 

Sedation may be indicated for children who have a level of anxiety that prevents good coping skills, those who are very young and do not understand how to cope in a cooperative fashion, or those requiring extensive dental treatment. Sedation can also be helpful for some patients who have special needs.

 

Q: Why utilize sedation?

 

Sedation is used for a child’s safety and comfort during dental procedures. It allows the child to cope better with dental treatment and helps prevent injury to the child from uncontrolled or undesirable movements. Sedation promotes a better environment for providing dental care.

 

Q: What medications are used?

 

Various medications can be used to sedate a child. Medicines will be selected based upon your child’s overall health, level of anxiety and dental treatment recommendations.

 

Q: Is sedation safe?

 

Sedation can be used safely and effectively when administered by a pediatric dentist who follows the sedation guidelines of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. Your pediatric dentist will discuss sedation options and patient monitoring for the safety and comfort of your child.

 

Q: What special instructions should I follow before the sedation appointment?

 

Children often perceive a parent’s anxiety which makes them more fearful. They tolerate procedures best when their parents understand what to expect and prepare them for the experience. If you have any questions about the sedation process, please ask. As you become more confident, so will your child. Should your child become ill, contact your pediatric dentist to see if it is necessary to postpone the appointment. Tell your pediatric dentist about any prescribed, over-the-counter or herbal medications your child is taking. Check with your pediatric dentist to see if routine medications should be taken the day of the sedation.

Your pediatric dentist will provide you with additional detailed instructions before your sedation visit. It is very important to follow the directions regarding fasting from fluids and foods prior to the sedation appointment.

 

Q: What special instructions should I follow after the sedation appointment?

 

Your pediatric dentist will evaluate your child’s health status and discharge your child when she is responsive, stable and ready to go. Children recover from effects of sedatives at different rates so be prepared to remain at the office until the after-effects are minimal. Once home, your child must remain under adult supervision until fully recovered from the effects of the sedation. Your pediatric dentist will discuss specific post-sedation instructions with you, including appropriate diet and physical activity.

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