Appliances and How They Work

Space Maintainers

 

Q: What are space maintainers?

 

A: Space maintainers are appliances made of metal or plastic that are custom fit to your child’s mouth. They are small and unobtrusive in appearance. Most children easily adjust to them after the first few days.

 

Q: Why do children lose their baby teeth?

 

A: A baby tooth usually stays in place until a permanent tooth underneath pushes it out and takes its place. Unfortunately, some children lose a baby tooth too soon. A tooth might be knocked out accidentally or removed because of dental disease. When a tooth is lost too early, your pediatric dentist may recommend a space maintainer to prevent future space loss and dental problems.

 

Q: Why all the fuss? Baby teeth fall out eventually on their own!

 

A: Baby teeth are important to your child’s present and future dental health. They encourage normal development of the jaw bones and muscles. They save space for the permanent teeth and guide them into position. Remember: Some baby teeth are not replaced until a child is 12 or 14 years old.

 

Q: How does a lost baby tooth cause problems for permanent teeth?

 

A: If a baby tooth is lost too soon, the teeth beside it may tilt or drift into the empty space. Teeth in the other jaw may move up or down to fill the gap. When adjacent teeth shift into the empty space, they create a lack of space in the jaw for the permanent teeth. Therefore, permanent teeth are crowded and come in crooked. If left untreated, the condition may require extensive orthodontic treatment.

Q: How does a space maintainer help?

 

A: Space maintainers hold open the empty space left by a lost tooth. They steady the remaining teeth, preventing movement until the permanent tooth takes its natural position in the jaw. It is more affordable — and easier on your child — to keep teeth in normal positions with a space maintainer than to move them back in place with orthodontic treatment.

 

Q: What special care do space maintainers need?

 

A: Pediatric dentists have four rules for space maintainer care. First, avoid sticky sweets or chewing gum. Second, do not tug or push on the space maintainer with your fingers or tongue. Third, keep it clean with conscientious brushing and flossing. Fourth, continue regular dental visits.

 

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Mouth Protectors

 

Q: What are athletic mouth protectors?

 

A: Athletic mouth protectors, or mouth guards, are made of soft plastic. They are adapted to fit comfortably to the shape of the upper teeth.

 

Q: Why are mouth guards important?

 

A: Mouth guards hold top priority as sports equipment. They protect not just the teeth, but the lips, cheeks, and tongue. They help protect children from such head and neck injuries as concussions and jaw fractures. Increasingly, organized sports are requiring mouth guards to prevent injury to their athletes. Research shows that most oral injuries occur when athletes are not wearing mouth protection.

 

Q: When should my child wear a mouth guard?

 

A: Whenever he or she is in an activity with a risk of falls or of head contact with other players or equipment. This includes football, baseball, basketball, soccer, hockey, skateboarding, even gymnastics. We usually think of football and hockey as the most dangerous to the teeth, but nearly half of sports-related mouth injuries occur in basketball and baseball.

 

Q: How do I choose a mouth guard for my child?

 

A: Any mouth guard works better than no mouth guard. So, choose a mouth guard that your child can wear comfortably. If a mouth guard feels bulky or interferes with speech, it will be left in the locker room. You can select from several options in mouth guards. First, preformed or “boil-to-fit” mouth guards are found in sports stores. Different types and brands vary in terms of comfort, protection, and cost. Second, customized mouth guards are provided through your pediatric dentist. They cost a bit more, but are more comfortable and more effective in preventing injuries. Your pediatric dentist can advise you on what type of mouth guard is best for your child.

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BATON ROUGE OFFICE

4607 Sherwood Common Blvd. Building 1
Baton Rouge LA 70816

Phone: (225) 924-6622

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17534 Old Jefferson Hwy.
Suite C1
Prairieville, LA 70769

Phone: (225) 673-9600

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13375 LA Hwy. 73
Suite B
Geismar, LA 70734

Phone: (225) 673-9898

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149 Del Orleans Ave.

Denham Springs, LA 70726


Phone: (225) 667-9899

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